Free Professional Development Workshops
In this series of virtual workshops, the Asian American Education Project will be showcasing our curriculum on the Asian American Pacific Islander (“AAPI”) experience. It is divided into themes to make it easier for educators to adapt the whole or part of the curriculum into their own practice. The workshop participants will:
Our lesson plans are developed in partnership with UCLA Asian American Studies Center and PBS LearningMedia. The thematic unit was created by Waka Takahashi Brown, Curriculum Specialist, Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) with our lesson plans.
You may be eligible to receive one-hour credit for professional development / salary advancement. Please check with your school to determine if this is an option. To receive a certificate, please check the professional development / salary advancement certificate box when you register. A full hour of attendance and the completion of the Professional Development Reflection Form are required to receive the certificate.
Workshop Registration or Inquiry
(Free of charge)
Please check your SPAM folder one or two days before the workshop if you do not receive an e-mail from us on registering for the workshop Zoom link.
 
Workshop Descriptions:
Citizenship
What does it mean to be a U.S. citizen? What are the barriers to citizenship? Even today, AAPIs still face such barriers. A forgotten point is that there are Asian DREAMers. What barriers do they face? The Citizenship unit examines the social construct of race, and the definitions of ethnicity, nationality, citizenship and constitutional rights. The unit looks into the barriers AAPIs face in realizing citizenship. The workshop will explore the Citizenship unit.
 
Civil Rights
Civil rights are not handed to us. They are fought for. The AAPI population is not an exception. Faced with adversities, the AAPI community has found ways to participate in the civil rights struggle. The Civil Rights unit covers Asian Americans’ legal battles in school desegregation, the constitutional violations of Japanese Americans during WWII incarceration, the Filipino Americans’ grape strike for workers’ rights, the victimization of South Asian Americans in the aftermath of 9/11/2001. In the workshop we will take a look at the Civil Rights unit, diving into its history and achievements the AAPI community has accomplished and challenges they face.
 
Elementary Education
It is never too early to educate students about history and current events. This workshop will focus on delivering our curriculum to elementary school students.
 
Identity
What does it mean to be American? The criteria for what defines an American have changed throughout history at the detriment to minority populations. The Identity unit examines the model minority myth and perpetual foreigner myth as forms of systemic racism against AAPIs. The unit also examines the social construct of race, and the definitions of ethnicity, nationality, citizenship and constitutional rights. This unit coves what it means to be loyal Americans, using WWII as a backdrop. This unit covers the rise of Asian Americans in public offices, in advancing equality for women and LGBTQ rights. This unit covers the importance of knowing your own history as key to knowing yourself and your identity. This workshop will explore the Identity unit and how AAPIs have been stereotyped and how they have found ways to forge their own identities in American society.
 
Immigration
Immigration for certain groups of people is not always welcomed to the United States. Barriers are often placed to bar and restrict certain groups of people, even in the present. The Immigration unit covers the contribution of Chinese Transcontinental Railroad workers, the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Civil Rights Act of 1964 which gave way to the passage of the Immigration Act of 1965 which led to Asian Americans to become the fastest growing population. This unit also covers the Southeast Asian refugees’ migration in the aftermath of the Vietnam War and the Asian American DREAMers. The workshop will explore the Immigration unit, the desire for immigrants to come to the United States and the past and present challenges they face. This unit also explores some of the past and present immigration policies, the motivation behind the creation of these policies, and their impact.
 
Racism
Recent times have brought acts of anti-Asian racism and hate to the national spotlight. However, this is not something new, but rather something old. Over the course of U.S. history, AAPIs have been the targets of hate crimes and discrimination. The Racism unit covers how the Igorot people were used as human zoo in 1904 World’s Fair, the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Japanese American incarceration into concentration camps in WWII, McCarthyism and racial profiling, the American war in Vietnam, the hate crime murder of Vincent Chin and Joseph Ileto, the 1992 L.A. civil unrest and the systemic racism against Black Americans, 9/11/2001 and the victimization of South Asian Americans. This unit also examines the social construct of race, and the definitions of ethnicity, nationality, citizenship and constitutional rights. The workshop will explore our Racism unit. We will dive deeper into how discrimination and microaggressions affect minority groups and what we can do to prevent further discrimination and hate crimes in our society.
 
South Asian Americans, Guest Instructor: Dr. Pritpal Kaur
The South Asian Americans Workshop will explore the challenges and opportunities faced by South Asian Americans, with a focus on the Sikh community. It will cover immigration stories, immigration legislation (Bhagat Singh Thind), notable personalities (Dalip Singh Saund), and the contributions of South Asian Americans particularly to states like California. The workshop will also address cases of xenophobia, white supremacy and Islamophobia that have faced South Asian communities ranging from the Bellingham Riots in 1907, to hate crimes post 9/11, the 2012 Oak Creek mass shooting at a Gurdwara (Sikh house of worship) in Wisconsin, and the mass shooting in Indianapolis in April, 2021. The workshop will provide educators with tangible curricular and instructional resources for teaching about South Asian communities in the classroom.
 
Stand Against Hatred
Asian American Pacific Islanders (“AAPIs”) have been historically scapegoated for calamities in the U.S. Once again AAPIs are scapegoated for the COVID-19 pandemic. Since the beginning of the pandemic we have seen an exponential increase of hate and racist acts towards the Asian American Pacific Islander (“AAPI”) community. In this workshop, we will go over lessons that can be taught to students to help them better understand these issues. In a 3–part unit plan, your students will be able to look at the current rise of anti-Asian racism as a result of the pandemic and a history prior to that. This unit will end on a positive note of community building in order to promote a more just and safe society.
 
Workshop Schedule
Free of Charge
 
July 2021
Sun
25
Stand Against Hatred
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Jayson Chang
Full
Mon
26
Tues
27
Wed
28
Thurs
29
Fri
30
Sat
31
 
 
August 2021
Sun
1
Immigration
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Jayson Chang
Full
Mon
2
Tues
3
Wed
4
Thurs
5
Fri
6
Sat
7
Sun
8
Civil Rights
11:00 AM - 12:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Jayson Chang
Full
Mon
9
Tues
10
Wed
11
Thurs
12
Fri
13
Sat
14
Sun
15
Mon
16
Tues
17
Racism
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Dr. L. Erika Saito
Full
Wed
18
Thurs
19
Fri
20
Sat
21
Sun
22
Mon
23
Tues
24
Elementary Education
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Dr. L. Erika Saito
Full
Wed
25
Thurs
26
Fri
27
Sat
28
Sun
29
Mon
30
Tues
31
Identity
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT
Instructor:
Dr. L. Erika Saito
Full
Wed
Thurs
Fri
Sat
 
 
September 2021
Sun
 
Mon
Tues
Wed
1
Thurs
2
Fri
3
Sat
4
Labor Day Weekend
Sun
5
Labor Day Weekend
Mon
6
Labor Day
Tues
7
South Asian Americans
4:00 PM - 5:30 PM PDT
Guest Instructor:
Dr. Pritpal Kaur
Full
Wed
8
Thurs
9
Fri
10
Sat
11
Sun
12
Citizenship
10:00 AM - 11:30 AM PDT
Instructor:
Kate Lee
Full
Mon
13
Tues
14
Wed
15
Thurs
16
Fri
17
Sat
18
 
 
October 2021
Sun
Mon
Tues
Wed
Thurs
Fri
1
Sat
2
Sun
3
Mon
4
Tues
5
Wed
6
Thurs
7
Fri
8
Sat
9
Sun
10
Mon
11
Tues
12
Wed
13
Thurs
14
Fri
15
Sat
16
Sun
17
Mon
18
Tues
19
Chinese Massacre
5:00 PM - 6:30 PM PDT
Wed
20
Thurs
21
Fri
22
Sat
23
Sun
24
Mon
25
Tues
26
Wed
27
Thurs
28
Fri
29
Sat
30
 
Workshop Registration or Inquiry
(Free of charge)
 
K-12 Professional Development Workshop Partner Toolkit
Suggested Tweet:
The Asian American Education Project is offering FREE K-12 curriculum workshops.
Register here. @AAAJ_AAJC fiscal sponsor
The Asian American Education Project is offering FREE K-12 Professional Development Workshops. Register here. Join us & learn more about Asian American history today!

#AAPI #EdChat #StopAAPIHate #StopAsianHate @AAAJ_AAJC fiscal sponsor

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Suggested Copy for Facebook and Instagram:
The Asian American Education Project is offering FREE K-12 curriculum workshops. Each workshop covers a theme significant to the Asian American and Pacific Islander community, #AAPI, including anti-Asian hate, citizenship, civil rights, identity, immigration, and racism.
Join us to learn about how Asian immigrants have contributed and shaped the way the country is today since their arrival as far back as the 1800s. From labor activism to fighting for school integration and citizenship rights in the courts, and against model minority, perpetual foreigner stereotypes and anti-Asian hate, this one of the fastest-growing populations has faced adversity, and fought for opportunities to create roots here in the U.S.
Sign up for workshops here.
 
Suggested E-mail:
Subject: Telling the AAPI Stories: Sign Up for Free K-12 Professional Development Workshops
Asian American and Pacific Islander history is American history, but is often left out of curriculum in K-12 schools. Asian Americans Advancing Justice | AAJC, fiscal sponsor of The Asian American Education Project is announcing a series of free workshops for K-12 teachers designed to promote the inclusion of historically and culturally competent curriculum about Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (AAPIs) nationwide.
In this series of virtual workshops, The Asian American Education Project will be showcasing curriculum on the AAPI experience. It is divided into themes to make it easier for educators to adapt the whole or part of the curriculum into their own practice. The workshop participants will:
Join us to learn about how Asian immigrants have contributed and shaped the way the country is today since their arrival as far back as the 1800s. From labor activism to fighting for school integration and citizenship rights in the courts, and against model minority, perpetual foreigner stereotypes, Asian Americans - one of the fastest-growing populations - have faced adversity, and fought for opportunities to create roots here in the U.S.
Help us spread the word to provide a more inclusive curriculum to schools nationwide.
The lesson plans are developed in partnership with UCLA Asian American Studies Center. The thematic units were created by Stanford Program on International and Cross-Cultural Education (SPICE) with our lesson plans.
 
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